WPT Bay 101 Victory Goes to Brecher Over Liebert

WPT Bay 101 Victory Goes to Brecher Over Liebert
0 0 votes
By Jennifer Newell The World Poker Tour rolled into San Jose, California on March 16th for one of its most popular stops of the season at Bay 101. The Shooting Stars tournament boasts of bounties on the heads of 50 well-known players, Day 1A and 1B chip lead bonuses, and fans that come out in droves like no other stop on the tour. The shooting star aspect of the tournament put a $5,000 bounty and autographed t-shirt on the head of each notable and so-designated pro player, which creates a great deal of action, as everyone, including the bounties themselves, wants to knock out one or two of those players in an attempt to get their buy-in back. Day 1A began with 135 players, 23 of whom were shooting stars. But as the day came to an end, only 50 remained with Hoang Nguyen in the chip lead with 198,300. That garnered the day-end $10K bonus for Nguyen, to which he added $5K from eliminating shooting star John Juanda earlier in the day. The most bounties were taken by Shawn Buchanan throughout the day, as he got $15,000 for taking out three shooting stars. Behind Nguyen in the chip counts was David Pham, and the top five were rounded out by Conner Stockett, Jonathan Little, and Matt Lessinger. Day 1B found a larger starting field with 256 players, which included 27 shooting stars. That day’s registration total made the overall tournament number as 391 players and put the prize pool over the $3.7 million mark. The top 45 were to get paid, with the top finisher to receive $1,025,500. When the day finally came to an end, it was Isaac Baron in the chip lead for the $10K bonus to add to his Chris Ferguson knock-out bonus of $5K on the last hand of the night. The rest of the top five on the leaderboard were Vivek Rajkumar, Wook Kim, Luis Velador, and Gary Tighe. The remaining 145 players that began on Day 2 were set to play to the money and beyond, as the goal was to play to 36 before the day was done. When the money bubble approached, it was Steve Brecher doubling up at one table while Vincent Shaw pushed all-in at another. Hoyt Corkins and Farzad Bonyadi called Shaw, and when the board came down td 6h 3c qd 7c, Corkins ended up winning with 9-8. Shaw mucked and accepted his position as the bubble player. That left the last 45 players in the money, and Wook Kim was the first to take a piece of it with his 45th place finish worth $12,500. As the night wore on, Daniel Alaei took 38th place and OSman Wakili took 37th to end the action. Of the 36 players left, Michael Kamran was the leader with 570,500 chips, and the rest of the top five were Tony Behari, Chris Moore, Dan O’Brien, and John Monnette. In addition, there were only four shooting stars remaining - Kathy Liebert, Paul Wasicka, Hoyt Corkins, and Joe Sebok. Day 3 was the day set to determine the final six, and it started off with Jeremy Meier leaving the tournament in 36th place. Eliminations of note throughout the day included Sebok in 25th place, Luis Velador in 24th, Corkins in 21st, Rajkumar in 16th, and Amnon Filippin in 12th. With the ousting of Farzad Bonyadi in ninth place and John Monnette in eighth, the final table bubble was on. That distinction finally went to Michael Kamran, who was ousted by Steve Brecher and his queen-high flush. Kamran took home $90K for his seventh place finish. With that, Kathy Liebert went to the final table as the last shooting star standing and the most experienced player at the table, finding herself at her sixth WPT final table. But her average stack would have to find its way through larger stacks like Brecher and Behari. All of the starting chip counts for the March 20th final table were as follows: Seat 1: Chris Moore 1,476,000 Seat 2: Thao Le 711,000 Seat 3: Steve Brecher 2,016,000 Seat 4: Tony Behari 2,046,000 Seat 5: Kathy Liebert 1,180,000 Seat 6: Chau Vu 352,000 There was action shortly into the final table play, which was led by short-stacked Chau Vu pushing all-in for his last 202K with as 8d, but Tony Behari was there to make the call with pocket eights. The board ran out ks jd tc 9d 3c to allow the pair to stand up and Vu to be eliminated in sixth place with the $135,000 in corresponding prize money. Only a few hands later, a hand that started innocently enough with Thao Le and Kathy Liebert led to a 5s 2d 2h flop, but more betting led to the 6s turn. Le ended up all-in at that point with pocket queens, but Liebert had the ultimate overpair in pocket aces. The 7h came on the river and sent Le out in fifth place with $180,000. With a slow blind structure in place, the action slowed to a near halt at that point, though over the next hundred hands, Liebert doubled through Moore and Behari during that time. But it wasn’t until the 117th hand that another elimination took place. Behari sat with only 388K and pushed it from the small blind with kh 8h, finding one caller in Liebert with pocket tens. The board was an uneventful js 7d 2h 3c 4s, and Tony Behari left in fourth place with $230,000. The evening then soared past midnight and into the early morning hours. Moore took the time to double through Brecher, who then doubled through Liebert. Moore then took a significant pot from Liebert to leave her with under one million chips, but she consistently chipped up to find her way back to the safe zone. Finally, it was Moore and Brecher who battled after a 9h 5d 4d flop. Moore was the all-in player with ad kh for only ace high, but Brecher had the flush draw with kd 3d. The 5h on the turn led to the 6d and flush on the river, which send Chris Moore packing in third place with $291,500. Heads-up play began with the following counts: Steve Brecher 5,540,000 Kathy Liebert 2,280,000 The final two started play with extreme caution. Brecher was seeking his first major tournament win of his lengthy poker career, while Liebert was looking to turn her sixth WPT final table appearance into a victory. Liebert finally gained some chips through a double-up, but her 1.4 million would need much more help against the 6.4 million chips of Brecher. Finally, on the 319th hand of the night, after setting a new record for the longest WPT final table in the tour’s history, the final hand came to be. Liebert made the initial raised, but Brecher pushed the action with ac 9h. Liebert made the all-in call with qs ts. The dealer slowly gave them 6h 6s 2s 2c 4c to end the tournament. Kathy Liebert finished in second place, which was good for $550,000. Steve Brecher became the latest World Poker Tour champion and was awarded a hard-earned prize of $1,025,500 for the feat. (Thanks to WPT Live Updates for specific hand and chip count information.)

looking over the final table

looking over the final table chip counts the night before the action began and watching the recent interview of Kathy Liebert on carplayer's "The Scoop" I would have had to put my money on her. But I definitely feel the heads up match came down to the two favorites, as Bercher an old school player with a lot of experiece was looking for his first title too. Making 6 final tables in the WPT for Kathy is super strong imo, i am sure will take one down eventually. Why the fuck do I run so bad in 10k WPT god how have I not made a final table yet, so sick, varaince